CFP: Atlantic Communities: Translation, Mobility, Hospitality Conference

Atlantic Communities: Translation, Mobility, Hospitality

International Conference at University of Vigo (Spain)
17th – 18th September 2015

Co-organized by:
University of Vigo / University of Porto / Queen’s University Belfast

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Michael Cronin (Dublin City University)
Charles Forsdick (University of Liverpool)

The Atlantic Ocean has historically played a major role in the relationship between the “Old World” and the “New World” both perceived as a geographical and cultural divide between continents but also functioning as a space of transit, mobility and hospitality. Accordingly, the history and culture of the diverse countries and continents that border the Atlantic tends to be studied either in terms of regional influence within the framework of a geopolitics, or as a series of exchanges and encounters between the different people and territories on or near the Atlantic shores.

This international conference seeks to bring together scholars from across the social sciences and the humanities in order both to extend the focus of these approaches and to suggest new ways of thinking about what binds and what separates the communities and individuals that inhabit the complex social and cultural spaces on both sides of the Atlantic.

We invite proposals for twenty-minute papers that address these broad concerns. A suggested, though not prescriptive, list of questions that potential contributors may wish to interrogate and/or illustrate includes:

  • The Atlantic as an itinerary rather than a bounded site.
  • The movement of people and ideas.
  • Enforced migration and its consequences.
  • Trans/Atlantic journeys and translational processes.
  • Cultural exchange and encounter: contact, transfer and transformation.
  • Representations in transit: the Atlantic in writing, images and sounds.
  • “The rumble of tongues”: linguistic exchanges around/across the Atlantic.
  • The tracing of an Atlantic identity: Atlantic communities and national/political organization.

300-word abstracts to be sent to the organizers at: atlantico@uvigo.es by 31 January 2015.
These will be peer reviewed and acceptance will be notified by 28 February 2015.

Further details may be obtained from the organizers, Teresa Caneda, Rui Carvalho Homem and David Johnston, by emailing: atlantico@uvigo.es

Fellowship: Moore Institute Visiting Research Fellowships 2014-15

From The Moore Institute’s webpage:

“The Moore Institute for Research in the Humanities and Social Studies, will award a number of Visiting Research Fellowships in the arts, humanities and social sciences for the period September 2014 – June 2015. The Fellowship Scheme is designed to enhance the research culture of the University through collaborations between visiting fellows and staff at NUIG. Fellowship recipients will also benefit from working with the many rich collections within the James Hardiman Library, and will have the opportunity to interact with the vibrant research community in the university, city and region.”

The fellowships are for a maximum of one month, and must be taken during October 2014 – June 2015.
Completed applications are due 15 September 2014.

For more, please see The Moore Institute for Research in the Humanities and Social Studies page.

Fifth SILAS Conference: Cork 2015

Announcing the fifth SILAS conference, University College Cork, Ireland, 25-27 June 2015

DEADLINE EXTENDED

The Society for Irish Latin American Studies, the Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, UCC and the Geography Department, UCC invite you to participate in “Entangled Histories and Cultures: Re-mapping diasporas and migrations between Ireland and Latin America,” an international and interdisciplinary conference at University College Cork, Ireland, 25-27 June 2015. The proximity of Cork harbour, historically an important gateway for migration and trade between Ireland, Spain, and Latin America, provides a stimulating setting from which to explore Ireland’s engagement with the Iberian Atlantic world. Irish people moved and settled in the company of transatlantic diasporas from Europe, Africa, and Asia in the context of Empire. Inter-ethnic relations and cross-cultural connections were complicated by processes of class, race, and gender. We invite papers and panels from across the Humanities and Social Sciences focused on entangled histories and legacies of migration through different eras of colonialism, independence, and globalisation. We also welcome papers on the memory, representation, and transformation of the relationship between Ireland and Latin America.
Topics might include but are not limited to:

  • Private histories/public histories
  • Colonialism/anti-colonialism
  • Labour, gender and racialisation
  • Slavery, anti-slavery
  • Freedom, human rights, indigenous rights
  • Sexualities, race and mestizaje
  • Migration, diaspora, exile
  • Languages, literacies, discourse
  • Exile: political, social, linguistic
  • Peregrinations, wanderings, religious/official journeys
  • Lands, landings, placing and mapping
  • Sea voyages, Safe Harbours, Perilous Passages/Safe Passages, Perilous Harbours
  • Documents, passports, carnets de voyages and de passages/ travelogues/travel narratives
  • Alternative epistemologies
  • Difficulties of entanglement
  • Ekphrasis: Imagi(ni)ng journeys, fictional migrations, (dis-) appearing acts
  • Visual culture, music, dance
  • Literature, journalism
  • Missionaries, government aid, trade
  • Transnational digital communities
  • Neo-liberalism, environmental, development, and food relations
  • Affinities/resistances
  • Solidarities/exploitations
  • Film Studies: documentaries, short films, docufictions, current affairs programmes and migrations
  • The art of travelling, travelling and art, travel literature
  • Mental and physical health: diasporas, migrations and exiles

Conference organizers also welcome paper, panel, and presentation proposals from individuals or groups engaged in related disciplines, including graduate students, independent scholars, public and community historians, authors, poets, artists, musicians, dancers, activists, and community associations. Conference languages include English, Spanish and Portuguese.

Submission of Abstracts/Poster proposals of c. 200 words due 17 December 2014 to: silasucc2015@gmail.com

Answer from Academic Committee: Monday, 5 January 2015
Confirmation by Participants: Monday, 26 January 2015
Online Provisional Programme Publication: Monday, 23 February 2015
Submission of Power Point presentations: Saturday, 16 May 2015

CFP: IMSLA Special Issue

Travel Writing: Encounters within and through Irish and Latin American spaces

PDF version
Deadline for articles: September 30th, 2014

Contributions are now invited for the 2014/15 Special Issue of the Journal of Irish Migration Studies in Latin America, an international, refereed online journal, edited by Sinéad Wall and Laura Izarra.

Ireland and Latin America share experiences of colonisation which were to some extent aided by travel accounts from the early 1600s through to the 1900s, many of which were concerned with either military fortifications or commercial matters. Just as the ‘New World’ had become a zone to be exploited for its natural wealth, by the mid nineteenth century travel writing about Ireland had become a means of expressing British anxiety about the island. After the famine period of 1845 to 1852 Ireland became a place to be exploited by potential property investors as well as by writers hoping to make money out of the sometimes harrowing descriptions of poverty and hunger.

This Special Issue of the IMSLA seeks to engage with writings about Ireland and/or Latin America which offer different interdisciplinary perspectives from which to reconsider colonial encounters as well as texts which address the various effects, including psychic effects, provoked by the changing cultural formations of the late twentieth/early twenty-first centuries. These encounters might be framed within or going beyond what Mary Louise Pratt denotes as ‘contact zones’ –i.e. ‘social spaces where disparate cultures meet, clash, and grapple with each other’, or what Avtar Brah defines as ‘diaspora space’, that which ‘marks the intersectionality of contemporary conditions of transmigrancy of people, capital, commodities and culture’– including not only Latin American spaces but Irish spaces also. Therefore, the present issue on Travel Writing aims to consider narratives which could be read against various theoretical frameworks from various fields of knowledge such as history, sociology, anthropology, literature, linguistics among others, in order to highlight different experiences of power relations and cultural practices. We invite papers which interrogate travel between Ireland and Latin America and which examine alternative discourses of travel, whether in an Imperial or contemporary context. All articles will be subject to peer review and must conform to the Contributors Guidelines of the journal.

Articles should not be longer than 5,000 words, including references and notes. Suggested articles include, but are not limited to:

  • Historical or fictional accounts, diaries and reports (official or private) by missionaries, soldiers, diplomats, entrepreneurs among others
  • Encounters between Ireland and Latin America
  • Irish Migration, exile or diasporic writing about Latin America and vice versa
  • Irish/Latin American Interpretation and reinterpretation of travel writing
  • Writing at the margins
  • Women writing and gendered spaces
  • Postmodern and virtual travels
  • Transnational writings

For consideration, please submit articles (as an attached Word document) via email with the subject line “IMSLA Special Issue” by 30 September 2014 to Laura Izarra: lizarra@usp.br

Breac announces Breac Archives

Breac: A Digital Journal of Irish Studies, from the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame, has announced “a forthcoming initiative from the Breac project called Breac Archives, a secure digital repository designed and maintained by Irish Studies and Digital Humanities specialists at the University of Notre Dame.”
The Breac Archives project aims to create a bibliographical database, “a fully searchable, open-access resource which records all forms of scholarship relating to Ireland and Irish Studies.”
Please help them create this database by submitting the bibliographic details of your work at the Breac Archives page.

Fellowship: IACI-NUI Galway Fellowship 2014-15

The Irish American Cultural Institute (IACI) is now inviting applications for the IACI-NUI Galway Fellowship 2014-15. The fellowship provides an ideal opportunity to scholars normally resident in the United States who wish to spend a semester (not less than four months) at the Centre for Irish Studies, NUIG, and whose work relates to any aspect of Irish Studies. The Centre for Irish Studies is a designated Centre for Research Excellence at NUIG and details of current research and teaching programmes can be found here.

The stipend for the Fellowship is US$4,000. This includes transatlantic air transportation for the recipient.
NUI-Galway will provide the holder of the Fellowship with office accommodation, and with a number of privileges appropriate to the status of a visiting faculty member, e.g., access to some departmental secretarial and other facilities. The college will also advise the holder of various options for suitable accommodation.

The obligations and duties of the holder are as follows;
• During his/her residence, the holder is to give one faculty seminar on the subject of his/her research.
• During his/her residence, the holder is to be available for limited consultation with postgraduates in the appropriate discipline.
• Upon completion, the holder will be expected to provide a brief written report to the IACI Board of Directors, which may be published in the IACI’s newsletter, Dúċas.
• Any essay, book, or other presentation arising from Fellowship-funded research must carry a credit line identifying the IRISH AMERICAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE Visiting Fellowship in Irish Studies at National University Ireland-Galway.
• Upon completion of the semester, the holder will be expected to submit some part of Fellowship- funded research and writing for consideration by the editors of ÉIRE-IRELAND. (This is not to be construed as assurance of publication, however.)
• Upon return to United States, the holder may be asked to prepare and deliver a lecture based upon his/her research for an audience to be selected by the IACI.

The deadline for receipt of applications for the IACI-NUI Galway Fellowship 2015 is 28 February 2014.

Click here for the PDF application form.

Please click here for further details about this and other IACI programs.

Conference: Dissonant Voices: Faith and The Irish Diaspora

The University of Winchester in association with the London Irish Centre presents
Dissonant Voices: Faith and The Irish Diaspora
Saturday 8th March 2014  9.30 am to 5.30 pm
The Presidential Suite, The London Irish Centre, Camden Square, NW1 9XB

Admission £15. Register here.

Click here for the PDF version of Conference Flyer

The Catholic Church in Ireland has often been defined as a conservative, authoritarian and severe organisation.  This is only one side of the story.

The Dissonant Voices:Faith and the Irish Diaspora Conference will explore the other radical and yet thoroughly orthodox tradition and legacy of the people of the Irish Church.  The Conference will examine the politically and socially engaged faith of the Irish and the Irish Diaspora.

The Conference will survey the historical contribution to Europe of Irish Church men and women.  The Conference will hear from contemporary voices in Ireland, influenced and influencing the universal Church in its option for the poor and oppressed.

The legacy of this outspoken faith will be examined by contributors from the Irish Diaspora who are fired by this radical but often unpublicised Irish Church.

Speakers include: Dr Eamonn O Ciardh, Fr Joe McVeigh, Msgr Rayond Murray and Dr Oliver Rafferty SJ

If you would like more information about the conferences please contact Conn Mac Gabhann Voices@Winchester.ac.uk
To register, click here

CFP: Breac Special Issue on Irish Studies and Digital Humanities

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Irish Studies and Digital Humanities
Deadline: January 15th, 2014

In 2012, Stanley Fish posed the question: does the digital humanities offer new and better ways to realize traditional humanities goals? Or does the digital humanities completely change our understanding of what a humanities goal (and work in the humanities) might be? Practitioners within both the digital humanites and the humanities community more generally have offered many responses to Fish’s musings, but as Margaret Kelleher has observed, there is yet little investigation regarding the opportunities and implications afforded the study of Irish history, literature, and culture by electronic advances.

Addressing this seeming absence of engagement, issue 3 of Breac seeks to foreground the intersections between the digital humanities and work in the field of Irish Studies. What type of innovative resources, tools and methodologies have been produced by and for scholars working in the field? What challenges have those working on digital projects encountered? How does the design, development and use of digital tools relate to and/or advance traditional practices in Irish Studies? Positing the question in reverse, how can debates and practices in Irish Studies work in the digital humanities? What new challenges can Irish Studies bring to the digital humanities?

The guest editors of this issue, Breac Matthew Wilkens and Sonia Howell, invite submissions addressing the results of digital humanities projects as well as commentaries on the intersections and possibilities for future collaborations between Irish Studies and the digital humanities. Capitalizing on Breac’s digital form, we welcome submissions which can be best facilitated by an online journal. In keeping with Breac’s commitment to linguistic diversity, we also welcome submissions in languages other than English. Other topics of interest include, but are by no means limited to:

Data mining
Geospatial analysis
Data visualization
Scholarly editing
New media
Digital literature or poetry
Digital humanities and the Irish language
Digital humanities and world literature
The issue will include essays from Hans Walter Gabler (editor-in-chief of the Critical and Synoptic Edition of James Joyce’s Ulysses) on conceiving a dynamic digital research site for James Joyce’s Ulysses, Matthew Jockers (author of Macroanalysis and co-founder of the Stanford Literary Lab) on macroanalysis and Irish Studies, and Padraig Ó Macháin (Director of Irish Script on Screen) on how the digital revolution has affected Irish Studies and Irish-language scholarship. It will also feature a review of Franco Moretti’s Distant Reading by Joe Cleary (author of Literature, Partition and the Nation-State: Culture and Conflict in Ireland, Israel and Palestine).

Typical articles for submission vary in length from 3,000-8,000 words, but the editors are happy to consider pieces that are shorter or longer. Deadline for submission of manuscripts is January 15, 2014. Full submission instructions are available at http://breac.nd.edu/submissions/. Questions are welcome and should be sent to breac.djis@gmail.com.
(Full CFP available here)

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